High Cholesterol: Cholesterol-Lowering Medication

If you have high cholesterol, your doctor may recommend cholesterol medication in addition to a diet low in saturated fat, high in fiber, and low in refined carbohydrates.

 Cholesterol is an important part of your cells and also serves as the building block of some hormones. The liver makes all the cholesterol the body needs. But cholesterol also enters your body from dietary sources, such as animal-based foods like milk, eggs, and meat. Too much cholesterol in your blood can increase the risk of coronary artery disease.

The first line of treatment for abnormal cholesterol is usually to eat a diet low in saturated and trans fats, and high in fruits and vegetables, nuts, and seeds, and to increase exercise. But for some, these changes alone are not enough to lower blood cholesterol levels; they also may need medicine to bring down their cholesterol to a safe level.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs include:

  • Statins
  • Niacin
  • Bile-acid resins
  • Fibric acid derivatives
  • Cholesterol absorption inhibitors

Cholesterol-lowering medicine is most effective when combined with a healthy diet and exercise.

How Do Statins Work?


How Does Nicotinic Acid Work?


How Do Bile Acid Resins Work?


How Do Fibrates Work?


Combination Drugs for Cholesterol Lowering

 

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